The Ways We Take Away From Our Lives {Flash Dharma}

We lose so much of our lives by dwelling on the past, obsessing about the future, or just wishing really hard that right now was different. But this is where we are.

 

By Daniel Scharpenburg

This life right now, in each moment, is all we really have.

The past is gone and the future is only potential. We spend so much time not focused on the here and now, but we do have the power to change that.

We have a few ways that we tend to take away from the fullness of our lives. We sleepwalk—we just go through the motions of life without being present or acting with intention. This is where we just let things happen and we don’t really reflect on why we do the things we do.

We also take away from the fullness of our lives by wishing. We consistently don’t value where we are. To wish we were somewhere else is to take away from here. To wish to be entertained instead of doing nothing is to take away from doing nothing. There is value in doing nothing.

To give to our lives is to understand what it means to be “good enough.” We are good enough and what we are doing is good enough. We’re trying to learn how to enter this moment completely without judgment, without hating our experience or wishing for something else.

We lose so much of our lives by dwelling on the past, obsessing about the future, or just wishing really hard that right now was different. But this is where we are.

We might imagine our meditation practice taking us to some special place or giving us some magical experience. That’s not what happens; we are training to be here. That’s it. It is completely ordinary.

When we’re fully present we can learn how to be content.

 

Photo: Pixabay

Editor: Dana Gornall

 

Did you like this post? You might also like:

 

A Lesson in Meditation.

    By Jason Garner   A few months ago my youngest nephew visited me with my sister and brother-in-law. I spent some time alone talking with Aidan, who told me about the fears he was experiencing, especially at bedtime. His stories of lying in bed afraid...

What it Means to Approach an Approach State

  By Richard Daley In his book Mindsight, Dr. Daniel Siegel mentions an “approach state.” He defines this state as one which allows us to move toward, rather than away from challenging situations. This is not only in relation to external...

Pros & Cons of Meditation Apps: Can They Help Us Be More Mindful?

  By Sunny Chayes Often what comes to mind when I think of my iPhone is how mindful it really isn't. I think of the many times the person with whom I am sharing a meal has picked up their phone to make a call or look something up on the...

Sit Down, Be Still, Shut Up: A Basic Meditation Guide

  By Sherrin Fitzer I first became interested in meditation when I was in high school, but cannot remember how or why. I bought the book called, How to Meditate  by Lawrence LaShan. The rest of my memories are hazy. I do remember thinking that I could not...

Comments

comments

Daniel Scharpenburg

Daniel lives in Kansas City. His background is in the Zen tradition and he was empowered to teach by the Dharma Winds Zen Sangha. He runs Fountain City Meditation. He has experience leading meditation events, giving dharma talks, and doing koan study.

Find out more about Daniel here and connect with him on Facebook

Latest posts by Daniel Scharpenburg (see all)