It wasn’t until I started my yoga-teacher training that I realized how much I had to learn and could grow in my practice. I found that a different approach and more intensive practice has been opening up parts of me that have been closed for a long time.

 

By Gina Ficociello

 

I have been meditating as long as I can remember and always thought I had a pretty good practice being able to quiet my mind and stay blank and silent.

It wasn’t until I started my yoga-teacher training that I realized how much I had to learn and could grow in my practice. I found that a different approach and more intensive practice has been opening up parts of me that have been closed for a long time.

Recently toward the end of a two day training, we had a restorative yoga class followed by savasana. This one was exceptional. During the week, I had been working on having more of a heart-centered practice and focus on being more open and connected during meditation.  It brought me to a place where I had such a deep realization and release that I couldn’t help but cry.

Having been one to hide my pain, it was such a strange feeling to just let the tears flow down my face. Not wanting to move, I just let them fall knowing I was among trusted and kindred souls. Coming back to full consciousness after meditation, I felt a wave of deep love and peace that I had not felt for a long time.

Later in the day, my teacher touched my shoulder and asked if I was okay. I was at a loss to explain what I felt. All I could do was smile and nod. Somehow I think she understood.

 

Want to share your meditation story? Send us a photo and a few paragraphs about how you started your practice and how it benefits you to: editor@thetattooedbuddha.com


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