A whole week went by and only two people asked how I was—one was my supervisor. It wouldn’t have mattered, I would have said I was fine.

By Gina Ficociello

I write this lying in bed recovering from a life-changing illness. Not life-threatening; life-changing.

I have the flu. I have had it before, but never like this. The first two days I lay in bed half conscious, either sleeping or praying for sleep. After the nausea and headaches subsided, I started getting up and trying to eat. Normally, I‘d love the idea of lying in bed reading and playing Scrabble on my phone, but I couldn’t concentrate at all. I zoned in and out for the next two days. Me and my thoughts.

I realized that I had unwittingly completed a 4-day cleanse. No sweets, no alcohol—still had my coffee though. I had been craving tomato soup, bread, and for some strange reason mac-n-cheese, but stuck with pretty simple, small portions of nuts, fresh fruit, rye toast and tomato soup.

It felt good, and I decided to make this my tipping point to healthier eating and small portions.

I scheduled a hair appointment with my stylist. Texting, I told her that reaching out to her was harder than going to confession. She got the reference, since it had been so long since I had been in to see her. She told me to say five Hail Marys and be sure to make more time for myself in the future. Good advice.

I thought about buying a rice maker. I made a good decision not to buy one after watching way too many YouTube videos by a vegan couple, an Asian couple and an Italian grandma. I realized that I don’t need another kitchen appliance to eat better, which led me down the path of simplifying. Less can mean more.

I overpaid for a prescription I won’t use; actually three. They gave me insomnia and nausea. Seemed liked a cruel joke: trade cough and congestion for insomnia and nausea at the cost of $80.00. Seriously?

I did my daughter’s hair. She told me about a boy she liked and asked me what I thought. I didn’t answer right away because I couldn’t talk without coughing. So she told me what she thought. I listened.

I had snuggle time with my dog. She loves me even if I can’t do anything for her, except love her back.

A whole week went by and only two people asked how I was—one was my supervisor. It wouldn’t have mattered, I would have said I was fine.

So I think have my News Year’s resolutions:

  • Eat more simple, smaller portions of what I truly enjoy
  • Plan ahead to make time for myself
  • Simplify
  • Listen more
  • Spend time with those I love and cherish

 

Gina Ficociello is a budding writer living in Amherst, Ohio with her two teenage daughters, Josie and Julia, and adorable dog, Yoshi. Growing up on a farm gives her a unique perspective derived from love of nature. She’s the kind of girl that would sit out all night just to watch the moon glow and then sleep outside of the tent to watch the sun rise.

 

 

Photo: (source)

Editor: Alicia Wozniak

 

 

 

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