There is a friendship lamp that changes colors any time my friend Britta touches it. She moved away, so we keep in touch by text, phone, email and touch lamp. There is a picture of me with two friends on top of that lamp. The girl in the middle passed away in December. She was such a gift in this life. The girl on the left is still here, and because we lost our friend, we treasure our friendship that much more.

 

By Indira Grace

I am currently sharing space with a roommate, so my altar is restricted to my bedroom.

When I had a house, I had altars all over my living space. I also keep an altar at my workspace. It has a meditating cat, a picture of my beloved, some crystals, pictures of my teachers and cards from friends. My altars are my reminders to be present, be in the moment, express gratitude for each breath, to express love for myself and my planet, and to honor my teachers and those who have gone before me.

They are snapshots of my life, the lives of those I love and respect, and things that represent the memories that I treasure most.

This altar has a large Buddha in the middle, and it is one of my most favorite statues. I also have a statue of Kuan Yin in the front left corner. This was a gift from my business partner, before she died of cancer in 2014.

I have pictures of various teachers, such as His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Amma, the Hugging Saint. I also have pictures of a meditating Jesus and of Lakshmi, the Hindu Goddess of Abundance. I keep fresh flowers on my altar, as an offering to my teachers and to Spirit. There are crystals, some holy water, an incense burner, a candle my friend Julie made, a dish of coins and a mala.

There is a friendship lamp that changes colors any time my friend Britta touches it. She moved away, so we keep in touch by text, phone, email and touch lamp. There is a picture of me with two friends on top of that lamp. The girl in the middle passed away in December. She was such a gift in this life. The girl on the left is still here, and because we lost our friend, we treasure our friendship that much more.

Behind that picture is my first “non-Paint and Sip” painting that I did for a pre-ministerial class I recently took. It reminds me of my talents and gifts in this world, as well has my need for daily self-care. There’s a container of Tibetan Musk in the front, and a singing bowl I obtained from the Drepung Gomang monks who travel to Kansas City every year or so.

Tucked next to the right arm of the Buddha is something very dear to me. It is a badge only given to the members of the Kansas City, Kansas Police Department. On it are the badge numbers of two police officers that were killed in the line of duty in a short amount of time—one was the father of my son. A dear friend knew how much this man meant to me and obtained one for me. I keep it there to honor Dave’s memory.

In my storage unit are more pictures, elephants, my grandmother’s glasses, tablecloths and so much more.  Each item on my altar is a treasure to me.

 

Do you have an altar you would like to share for the Sacred Little Altars Everywhere Series?

Send it to: editor@thetattooedbuddha.com

 

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Indira Grace