Everything that happens in your life is an opportunity to practice mindfulness or compassion (often both). We want to resist the idea that “These parts of my life are spiritual and these other ones are not.”

 

By Daniel Scharpenburg

This is important to remember because people get confused and lost sometimes.

The path of the Bodhisattva isn’t something we’re just doing on the cushion or in the temple. Well, maybe it is, but it isn’t supposed to be. It’s supposed to be something we are working with in every part of our lives. I think this barely requires explanation, but I’ll try anyway.

There’s an old image I used to hear about. It was the image of a guy who goes to a brothel on Saturday night and has a really good time, staying up really late and engaging in all sorts of activities. Then, on Sunday morning he goes to church with his wife and kids, wearing the best clothes and judging the other families and feeling great about himself.

We want to try not to be like that guy.

I’m not just being a Buddhist when I’m in a temple, sitting, writing, teaching, volunteering at a local charity…it would be easy to say those are the times when I’m being a Buddhist but that’s not what we’re talking about. I’m also trying to manifest awakening when I’m talking to my kids, when I’m at work, when I’m driving, when I’m doing the dishes….you get the idea.

When I am talking to my kids is a big one. I think a lot of people struggle with mindful parenting.

Everything that happens in your life is an opportunity to practice mindfulness or compassion (often both). We want to resist the idea that “These parts of my life are spiritual and these other ones are not.” Master Lin Chi said, “If you love the sacred and despise the ordinary, then you are still bobbing in the ocean of delusion.” These divisions are things we’re creating ourselves. I think it helps us to understand that.

Don’t love the sacred and despise the ordinary.

It’s all sacred.

 

Photo: (source)

Editor: Dana Gornall

 

 

Did you like this post? You might also like:

 

 

Just One Thing: What are You Holding Onto?

  By Rick Hanson PhD.    The Practice: Just Let Go Why? I've done a lot of rock climbing, so I know firsthand the importance sometimes of not letting go! This applies to other things as well: keeping hold of a child's hand while crossing the street, staying true...

At the End of Your Rope? Meditation for Parents.

By Dana Gornall Some people search far and wide for a spiritual teacher or journey. They feel like they need to travel to another country or don special robes to become spitiual. Maybe they seek out a teacher and study sacred texts. This is one way to learn about...

Confessions of a Zen Zealot

  By Tyson Davis I remember one time when I was a kid, probably around age 10 or so, my brother and I saw some Jehovah’s Witnesses heading down the street in the direction of our house. Earlier that day we had found a dead snake on the...

When I Stopped Just Reading about Zen & Actually Started Practicing It

  By Tyson Davis Sentient Beings are numberless, I vow to save them. ~ First of the Four Bodhisattva Vows Our editor, Buddha bless her soul, sent out a request asking us to talk about how our meditation practice has helped us in our daily lives. This...

Comments

comments