I find that on the bike I am present. It’s one of the only times I ever really am. My mind tends to wander to the future or the past or fixing things or making plans or worrying about this or that. You can’t do that on the bike or you might die.

 

By Kimby Maxson

I’m in a women’s riding group and agreed to write the monthly newsletter.

I chose to write about moto-meditation after getting in a conversation with a fellow yoga teacher. She insisted that in order to properly meditate a person needs stillness to which I vehemently disagree. In fact stillness makes me anxious and therefore unable to meditate!

I suppose I’ve always meditated through movement. I was s ballerina growing up—that was the way I cleared my mind, focused and found balance (literally and figuratively).

19 years ago I had ovarian cancer and started practicing more mantra based meditation to stave off anxiety) and as a distraction I suppose).

As far as this motorcycle picture, I find that on the bike I am present. It’s one of the only times I ever really am. My mind tends to wander to the future or the past or fixing things or making plans or worrying about this or that. You can’t do that on the bike or you might die. I try meditating elsewhere but my mind is a pain in the ass.

On the bike it never fails.

Comments

comments

The Tattooed Buddha

The Tattooed Buddha strives to be a noncompetitive, open space for the author’s authentic voice. We offer a dialogue that is aware and awake to the reality of our present day to day, tackling issues of community, environment, and compassionate living. A space for the everyday person, whether Buddhist, Hindu, Jew, Christian, Pagan, or secular humanist, we hope to provide a platform for a voice that seeks to change the world one article at a time.
(Visited 71 times, 1 visits today)