Metta: Kindness to Cure Fear | Video

Fear is a normal emotion, but it can spiral out of control into anxiety. Suddenly that fear instinct seems to overwhelm us and we feel that fear response constantly or all of the time. The Buddha address fear with the Metta Sutta, and using the mind to focus on positive things.

 

By Daniel Scharpenburg

Fear. We all feel it.

Fear of heights, fear of small spaces, fear of getting up in front of an audience and speaking, fear of telling someone how you feel.

Fear is a normal emotion, but it can spiral out of control into anxiety. Suddenly that fear instinct seems to overwhelm us and we feel that fear response constantly or all of the time. The Buddha address fear with the Metta Sutta, and using the mind to focus on positive things.

In this talk I tell a story about some monks who were afraid of ghosts in the woods. They went to the Buddha to ask what they should do and he suggested reflecting on kindness as an antidote to fear.

The amazing thing about the Metta Sutta is that it not only distracts our minds, but it also helps us be a better person overall. Interested?

Have a listen:

 

 

Photo: Pixabay

Editor: Dana Gornall

 

Were you inspired by this post? You might also like:

 

Why are Buddhist Strings Different Colors & What Do the Colors Mean?

  By Daniel Scharpenburg Someone asked, "Why do these Buddhist strings have different colors? What do the different colors mean?" Unfortunately I don't have a satisfying answer for that question. Actually a lot of people seem to have questions...

Why Do Some Buddhists Wear Robes?

  By Daniel Scharpenburg   I have a set of robes that I don't like to wear. To me putting on robes feels kind of like playing dress up. Why would I dress up like a Chinese or Korean Zen teacher? I'm an American Zen teacher. Also they remind me a little too...

True Charity, Helping Others Without Worrying about if We Think They Deserve It | Video

 By Daniel Scharpenburg "If a poor man comes begging from you, give him what he needs, according to your means. Have great love and great compassion, considering him as if he were part of your own body. This is True Charity, True Sharing, True Giving."-So...

Entering the Gate (There is Nothing Stopping You)

  By Daniel Scharpenburg   The path is sometimes called The Gateless Gate. This represents both the methods of practice and the path to enlightenment. It's called gateless because there's really nothing stopping you. What we're talking about is...

Comments

comments

Daniel Scharpenburg

Daniel lives in Kansas City. He runs Fountain City Zen. Daniel is a Zen Priest and Meditation Teacher. He believes that meditation teachings can be shared with a little more simplicity and humility than we often see. He has been called "A great everyman teacher" and "Really down-to-earth." Daniel is affiliated with the Dharma Winds Zen Sangha, where he received ordination in 2018.

Find out more about Daniel here and connect with him on Facebook
(Visited 157 times, 1 visits today)