When we look at ourselves with honest awareness we can see that we are causing a lot of our bad feelings because we are obsessed with ourselves.

 

By Daniel Scharpenburg

 

There’s only one point. The point is to have an open heart.

The point is to stop being so self obsessed. It’s about being real with ourselves and others, and developing compassion. We can use this slogan when life gets us down; when we’re upset or dissatisfied or whining or pouting. There’s only one point.

We can ask ourselves, “Am I being self obsessed right now?”

When we look at ourselves with honest awareness we can see that we are causing a lot of our bad feelings because we are obsessed with ourselves. We think too much about our own needs, desires, and especially views. Just noticing this helps us open our hearts and minds.

Let go of your attachment to yourself and be more open. Think of others first. Ask yourself, “How much of what I do is purely motivated by selfishness?” Then, be honest when you answer. This can illuminate many aspects of our lives.

The fact of the matter is that all of these Buddhist teachings are rooted in taming the mind, overcoming the ego, and training in compassion. That’s what this path is all about.

We tame our minds with discipline and cultivate awareness so we can be more real and make better choices. We also cultivate compassion and kindness, so we can relate to the world around us in a more positive and affirming way. These are really all tied together and all rooted in one point—being your best self and engaging your true nature.

We think of developing compassion and wisdom as separate, but their both about finding our true selves. Compassion develops out of wisdom. Once we realize there’s nothing to hold on to we aren’t making enemies out of everything all the time.

The point is to open up to the world instead of shutting down.

 

The fact of the matter is that all of these Buddhist teachings are rooted in taming the mind, overcoming the ego, and training in compassion. ~ Daniel Scharpenburg Click To Tweet

 

Photo: Pixabay

Editor: Dana Gornall

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