True Charity, Helping Others Without Worrying about if We Think They Deserve It | Video

We should help when we can. Help others and don’t stop to wonder if they deserve your help. This is true generosity.

 

By Daniel Scharpenburg

 

“If a poor man comes begging from you, give him what he needs, according to your means. Have great love and great compassion, considering him as if he were part of your own body. This is True Charity, True Sharing, True Giving.”
-So Sahn, Mirror of Zen

Generosity is one of the great ways we connect with other people.

Compassion and generosity can be hard to find at times, but our corner of the world is a better place if we strive to have more compassion and to be more generous. Some of us see a homeless person by the side of the road and we don’t want to help them. We think maybe they will use our money for drugs or alcohol—we think that they don’t deserve our help because we aren’t sure what they will do with it. We should treat others how we would treat ourselves.

Not only material things can be given, but also our time and attention. It’s said that generosity is one of the easiest virtues in Buddhism to practice because it’s so clearly defined.

We should help when we can. Help others and don’t stop to wonder if they deserve your help. This is true generosity.

In this video I unpack a verse from Mirror of Zen on the subject of generosity. I hope you like it.

 

 

Photo: Pixabay

Editor: Dana Gornall

 


 

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