True Charity, Helping Others Without Worrying about if We Think They Deserve It | Video

We should help when we can. Help others and don’t stop to wonder if they deserve your help. This is true generosity.

 

By Daniel Scharpenburg

 

“If a poor man comes begging from you, give him what he needs, according to your means. Have great love and great compassion, considering him as if he were part of your own body. This is True Charity, True Sharing, True Giving.”
-So Sahn, Mirror of Zen

Generosity is one of the great ways we connect with other people.

Compassion and generosity can be hard to find at times, but our corner of the world is a better place if we strive to have more compassion and to be more generous. Some of us see a homeless person by the side of the road and we don’t want to help them. We think maybe they will use our money for drugs or alcohol—we think that they don’t deserve our help because we aren’t sure what they will do with it. We should treat others how we would treat ourselves.

Not only material things can be given, but also our time and attention. It’s said that generosity is one of the easiest virtues in Buddhism to practice because it’s so clearly defined.

We should help when we can. Help others and don’t stop to wonder if they deserve your help. This is true generosity.

In this video I unpack a verse from Mirror of Zen on the subject of generosity. I hope you like it.

 

 

Photo: Pixabay

Editor: Dana Gornall

 


 

Were you inspired by this post? You might also like:

 

Resentment: Letting Them Live in Your Head, Rent Free.

  By Ty H. Phillips   As a writer, I love words. I have a special fondness for the word insidious. I cannot explain why. I like the sound, I like how it feels rolling off of my Gene Simmons-sized tongue and it seems fitting to so much that goes on in our...

Because Self-Growth is Never Complete.

  By Kristen Maciejowski  Samsara in Buddhism, very simply put, is the circle of life, death and rebirth. The continual grasping and pushing away throughout this cycle is what Buddhists believe ultimately causes us suffering. The aim of Buddhism is to relieve not...

When You’re Buddhist & Angry

  By Alison Page I think anger gets a bad rep in Buddhism and other spiritual paths. As a practitioner, I feel a self-created pressure to always be kind to others, put the needs of others before my own, and always help out even when it is...

An Ordinary Man, a Broken Key & a Snowstorm: A Zen Christmas Story

  By Louis De Lauro So an ordinary man was teaching a juggling class at a community center in central New Jersey. It was a few days before Christmas. Most of his students were Jewish and Chinese-American. When the kind man said goodnight...

Comments

comments

Daniel Scharpenburg

Daniel lives in Kansas City. His background is in the Zen tradition and he was empowered to teach by the Dharma Winds Zen Sangha. He runs Fountain City Meditation. He has experience leading meditation events, giving dharma talks, and doing koan study.

Find out more about Daniel here and connect with him on Facebook

Latest posts by Daniel Scharpenburg (see all)

(Visited 83 times, 1 visits today)