Metta: Kindness to Cure Fear | Video

Fear is a normal emotion, but it can spiral out of control into anxiety. Suddenly that fear instinct seems to overwhelm us and we feel that fear response constantly or all of the time. The Buddha address fear with the Metta Sutta, and using the mind to focus on positive things.

 

By Daniel Scharpenburg

Fear. We all feel it.

Fear of heights, fear of small spaces, fear of getting up in front of an audience and speaking, fear of telling someone how you feel.

Fear is a normal emotion, but it can spiral out of control into anxiety. Suddenly that fear instinct seems to overwhelm us and we feel that fear response constantly or all of the time. The Buddha address fear with the Metta Sutta, and using the mind to focus on positive things.

In this talk I tell a story about some monks who were afraid of ghosts in the woods. They went to the Buddha to ask what they should do and he suggested reflecting on kindness as an antidote to fear.

The amazing thing about the Metta Sutta is that it not only distracts our minds, but it also helps us be a better person overall. Interested?

Have a listen:

 

 

Photo: Pixabay

Editor: Dana Gornall

 

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