We don’t have to think ill-will when someone hurts us. We don’t have to re-tell an atrocity over and over again. We don’t have to condemn or make fun of others to feel better (that works in an opposing way) and we certainly don’t have to talk shit.

 

By Debbie Lynn

An interesting thing is happening in our society with the movement of “being heard and speaking out,” and I can’t help but wonder why it took so long.

This isn’t about the feminist movement or the “Me Too” movement; it is about simply coming back to our logical sensibilities and the art of respect—Right Speech—the act of thinking, speaking and acting in kindness. I am not sure when the art of respect went out the door, but the art of talking trash swooped in like storm and has devalued our very essence, our core, and invaded our daily existence with a vengeance. It is everywhere and it is contagious.

The wow factor of the bold-and-wild nastiness with blatant disregard to the outcome is the result of bizarre, cowardly, and immature behavior that has blanketed our society. Meanwhile right speech is/was considered too weak and unavailable.

Unthinkable things have come off the tongue and out of the mouth, and the repercussions are felt in huge waves of pain. And for what? I truly don’t understand the motives. But the fact of the matter is: the more it happens, the less shock value the ugliness has on us, and we as a whole, become immune. But lately, I am seeing a backlash to the severity, and basic morality is trying to make a resurgence. This resurgence isn’t associated with any particular sect, gender or race and the efforts to a gentler way are finally returning.

It seems across the board the delusion of strength and power belonging to vile people with words of destruction, is now being cracked open by their own karma. And the more karma plays out, the easier it is to see we don’t have to react to or pretend to laud the things that repel us; it all takes care of itself (Karma is good like that).

So “right speech” is making its way home and we can all be the change. We don’t have to think ill-will when someone hurts us. We don’t have to re-tell an atrocity over and over again. We don’t have to condemn or make fun of others to feel better (that works in an opposing way) and we certainly don’t have to talk shit. Being held to higher standards for what we say and setting the example of how good it actually feels to put this into practice is a minimal duty, but one we might want embrace.

The end result may not always be in a timely manner (according to our clock) but that isn’t under our control. What is controllable however, is turning the page to some much needed language of love. Not wishy-washy immature babble, but a dialog of sincerity and truth. The conversations of wisdom and betterment that raises the energy off the subterranean floor and elevates the mind, body and soul.

Thinking mindfully, speaking with thoughtful intention to lift us out the quagmire, is not a hard thing to do. We can draw the line where racist and ignorant speech is not an option anymore, and this I have seen; it is slowly coming to fruition. This is the end result after we wake up from a disaster and we think about how we got there, what we can to advert more trauma, and how we can to be better.

Will we falter? Of course. But every time we override the urge to lash out, or speak with malice, we actually grow a bit and it doesn’t take long to change the way we look at our thoughts. Just pause and ask yourself what good will it do to be ugly? There is a huge difference in speaking up with love and with the highest intentions, and speaking down-and-out to be heard, to tear down good-will and destroy others.

I believe in common courtesy, in being polite and meaning it, and it should be natural and come from the heart. Yes, I said, “should” but speaking with integrity doesn’t need to be an anomaly. And I know our everyday life gets chaotic but when we curb the urge to dwell in the negativity of it all, add some humor, and say the things that need to be said without harm. Right Speech will take us a long way and we can simply be an example of a good human.

Who knows how far we can take it? I am hopeful.

 

Photo: Pixabay

Editor: Dana Gornall

 

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Debbie Lynn

Debbie Lynn is a Mother, Grandmother, Artist, Writer, Dancer, Yogi, Seeker of the Soul. A rock climber, rock collector, and has been known too run with scissors.

Debbie realized at a very young age that the outer reality was a far cry from her inner truth and meeting her inner wisdom head on always turned into a challenge. The wonderment, curiosity and hypocrisy of life led to exploration and a cumulative documentation (art and journaling) of what she lovingly calls “the purge”. It is her way of ridding any negative energy from the daily grind. She says, “In essence, it is a way to start fresh and cleanse the soul.” Debbie has had numerous articles published in Elephant Journal, The Edge Magazine, Sail Magazine and Cruising Outpost Now a featured writer for The Tattooed Buddha. Her daily posts can be found on Facebook-360 degrees of Inspiration (full circle)Facebook .
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