Perceptions can change, and will shift (even if just slightly) as we grow. We are human. Perceptions should change as we gain knowledge and understanding of the world around us, and as we interact with it.

 

By J.G. Lewis

Perception indeed.

One issue, any issue, may be viewed as right or wrong. Depending on personal morals, ethics, politics, spirituality (religion for those so inclined), or logic, we often grapple with what is correct. We are human.

Right or wrong may not seem obvious at times. Even the public (or popular) view of what is right, or wrong, is blurred in the present. So, we ask questions of each other, and more of our selves. The answers are not always there.

What is free speech, and what is considered hatred? Who has the right to say one thing, or another? We get caught up in the evolving and ever-present debate over right to live, or right to die. How we fill our minds or our stomachs, what we ingest or inject, can easily be criticized by others.

Is it wrong to questions another’s rights? Is it right to hold on so defiantly to our own beliefs? It is more than conscience or consensus. It is more than awareness. If we are to be free thinkers, perceptions are (and should remain) fluid.

Perceptions can change, and will shift (even if just slightly) as we grow. We are human. Perceptions should change as we gain knowledge and understanding of the world around us, and as we interact with it.

Our roles change, our minds and bodies change, as we adjust to our new perspective. I say ‘new perspective’ because how we see and understand the world—and our place within it—is bound to shift as we interpret both external and internal factors in our lives.

We need to remain open to the thoughts of others, and new paths, and altered intentions, if we are to even attempt to solidify our personal belief system. We are human.

How can we know right, if we have not witnessed what is wrong?

 

J.G. Lewis is a writer and photographer, a dreamer and wanderer, father and brother (an orphan of sorts), living in Toronto area. Formerly an award-winning journalist, he now writes mainly fiction and poetry. He practices Bikram Yoga, doesn’t take the camera out enough, and enjoys the snap, crackle and pop of music on vinyl. You can read more of J.G. on his website, www.mythosandmarginalia.com. Follow him on Facebook, catch his daily breath on Twitter at @sayit4word.

 

Photo: (source)

Editor: Dana Gornall

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