Week Nine

/Week Nine
Week Nine 2016-10-14T07:47:27+00:00

Week Nine

Equanimity

When our practice is firm, intent, well developed, and without motivation for gain or loss, we reach a stage called equanimity.

This stage of our engagement of meditation is like looking into a clear blue sky. We are seeing open space, devoid of direction, distraction, and discursiveness. It is an open and clear present moment. We can sit, or at least we feel we can, forever.

The process of equanimity is not one devoid of thought, even though it is often referred to as such, but one where the thought is solely that which we wish to engage with. The pacification of the mind is complete and the process of true meditation has begun.

 

Nothing is permanent in this wicked world, not even our troubles. ~ Charlie Chaplin

As a youngster, I spent years in martial arts classes.

I was obsessed with getting that black belt. My teacher told me that the belt system was unique to American students and that traditionally the belt just became dark and black from use, dirt, and time. It was at this stage, when it was black from years of sweat and toil that we were truly ready to begin.

As this path was pursued, the belt started losing fibers and stability and became old, frail, and white again.

Much like the stages of meditation, we are now back at the beginning. We are now ready to sit and search for the ultimate truth of liberation. It was this meditation that the Buddha spoke of when he told us, “Meditate today, for tomorrow we may regret.”

It was his years of devoted meditation practice that allowed him to finally sit into true meditation and understand the nature of reality.

We are now ready to sit and search for the ultimate truth of liberation.
This empty space reveals that so much of what we see and act upon is perspective and not truth and that relativity is often another word for ego.

Much like what we think we know of meditation is filled with misconception and opinion, so also what we practice as tradition today, is removed from what the Buddha actually taught.

We are now able to see the clear sky of truth and realize that mindfulness and meditation cannot be removed from the pursuit of liberation and have a healthy outcome.

This empty space reveals that so much of what we see and act upon is perspective and not truth and that relativity is often another word for ego. We should now be open to the possibility of the truths of the path: suffering, its causes, and the path of freedom from that suffering. Much like mathematical certainties, truth does have absolutes.

These absolutes are not found in the form of ritualized or dogmatic ideology but within the true nature of human behavior and our ability to correct and change it through transforming our addicted mind.

I hope you have enjoyed this process of learning about the nature and path of meditation. I hope to hear from you so that I can review your feedback, comments, and homework (which I hope you have kept up with).

I will offer a final Q&A for those who feel they want or need it (schedule to be set).

My true hope is that you continue down this path that you have started and truly seek for a deeper understanding of the nature of the mind. To build on to this course, I will be offering future four week courses that deal directly with the teachings, both original and modern, of Buddhism and how we can apply them to our lives in a modern culture.

I appreciate your interest and continued support of The Tattooed Buddha and my teachings as a priest, friend, writer and goof ball.

Be well,

Blessings,

Ty

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