The World is Not Coming at You.

Home/blog, Buddhism, Featured, Relationships/The World is Not Coming at You.

The World is Not Coming at You.

ego

 

By Andrew Peers

So what would you say if I said that the world is not coming at you, though admittedly it can often feel this way.

Instead, it’s coming from you. It’s a message from you, to you, about you. Which is good because it puts you back in touch with your power, the power of choice in your mind. The power to choose how you interpret what you see.

Your unconscious mind projects the movie called Everything Happening at the Moment, starring you. And your conscious mind is watching it all the time and taking it for the real thang.

Included in the movie is your own character, i.e., who you believe yourself to be. After all, you is all you’ve ever heard so far in your life. And everyone else out there is doing the same. They are them. But that doesn’t mean that it isn’t all just Netflix.

Really getting this, is to begin to turn the tables on the ego. Ego not in the psychological Freudian sense, but rather the developed complexity of personhood, the whole set-up of a poor little me all alone in a vast universe of colliding bodies and strange goings-on beyond my control.

Why do we do this set-up? Because we think—i.e., we buy into the thought—that we have separated ourselves from our true Self, where we are limitless and free, where we lack nothing, are forever safe and totally provided for.

So we hate ourselves for it immeasurably, a hate and fear that is continually played out in different variations of projection onto the TV screen, that little screen within the screen. This life I got it good, in the next life I’ll be born in the slums Sao Paulo. And so it will go on ad infinitum if you so believe, and there’ll be an equal number of good and bad lives.

Rather this than meet the unconscious mind head-on! Anything but that. That’s seriously ugly shit, of which the projected world pales by comparison. Not so many of us are even aware of the savagery lurking in those shadows.

So rather than face this we create a place to hide from it. We go hide in the bushes of the universe, we project a way out. The fault lies out there. It’s just the classic ol’ denial and projection thing again. We get addicted to judgment exactly that keeps it all real.

But what if we haven’t really separated ourselves from our Source at all?

Because the fact is, we haven’t. This is not a belief, it’s a fact. A fact that cannot be proven but can be experienced.

What if the separation never took place in reality, that it’s only a dream, having no reality except that we believe it? What if we are guilty of no crime at all, and that the truth is that we are innocent of everything, and all is well, and has always been so in reality?

Well ego doesn’t like this one little bit. And it will set itself against this—to it—non-existent version of you, try to draw you into a fight so that the struggle seems real again. But now it’s time to dispel all that that would see us locked into the system forever.

The Longing Look is more than a mere concept, it is a new mindset, a practice. It looks with longing to the time when the movie, lifetime after lifetime, simply becomes unnecessary. But within this, it is the laser gaze of wisdom gone crazy, undoing (not really popping) the ego-mind by looking past the appearance of the world it projects in our awareness, a world that only the ego needs to maintain. It is what the old Celts called second sight, that sees who we really are, beyond what our eyes tell us. It’s the mind, not the eyes, that see when we see things in our dreams, isn’t it? Our physical eyes are shut. Hell, we’re not even ‘home’.

Shit still happens, but now it is already unconditionally forgiven. We have given our love beforehand (for-given). To the point where it can no longer be called forgiveness, as the errors of others are seen for what they truly are: our own unconscious content. To forgive others in this way is to forgive yourself, and vice-versa of course. Happy days.

WARNING: the ego has its own version of this. It is the world’s ineffective and traditional way of forgiving others, which would have us see the error clearly, and only then overlook it. But by seeing it clearly in this way, the error has become real and therefore we cannot overlook it.

The practice of effective forgiveness is subtle, done in silence and within, and at the beginning is not easy. Especially in times of tragedy and disaster, let alone when you just have a bad cold. But it allows us to deal directly with our own unconscious mind. Whatever comes up in the movie can be regarded as a symbol of what is going on there.

It takes practice. With time it can become second nature. It can even become amusing, a cause for laughter as the ego throws up more and more bait. We are extending our love to something that doesn’t exist. That doesn’t matter, we extend our love to it anyway, as the expression of who we really are. We can live life knowing we are already home.

Fully living and loving in the apparent linearity of movie, which is already over anyway, can now be enjoyed all the more in the secure knowledge that we can never really be alone or separated from the source of our true life together, already immeasurably present here and now.

It’s the arrogance of the ego to believe we ever could be.

 

Photo: (source)

Editor: Alicia Wozniak

Comments

comments

Andrew Peers

Andrew "Dru" Peers is Anglo-Irish and spent over 20 years in Trappist monasteries in England, Ireland and the Netherlands. In 2011, he left the Order, traveling to the home of Celtic Buddhism in America and returned to Europe to work as a meditation teacher, combining this work with a passion for writing. Check out his website and online school for more information. You can also read more in his recently published book, The Family Jewels: Letters on Zen Koan by a Trappist Monk.
By | 2016-10-14T07:48:29+00:00 March 17th, 2016|blog, Buddhism, Featured, Relationships|0 Comments