Kindfulness by Ajahn Brahm. {Book Review}

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Kindfulness by Ajahn Brahm. {Book Review}

kindfulness cover 2015-border

 

By Ty H. Phillips

 

Ajahn Brahm does it again.

Returning with this small tome of wisdom aptly titled Kindfulness, students and readers of Brahm will once again be settling into his warmth and trademark humor, as they find themselves learning not just about mindfulness, but the process of simply engaging all things with a deep sense of kindness.

Brahm engages his stomach aches with kindness and even tells stories of students who approached their ATM machines with kindness. It becomes a process of not just being aware of each moment, but of being kind to it and with it—especially during struggle.

Brahm says, “Every time we are able to apply wisdom to reduce or overcome our problems, that is kindfulness.”

He isn’t speaking of going around issues though. Wisdom to him is a true sense of understanding what is happening, not just using knowledge to avoid it. When he have a depth of understanding, we can apply our kindfulness and engage the situation, transforming it into a lesson.

Although small, the tome is packed with great delight and insights that are recommended for the novice and advanced alike.

A wisdom so simple, it is easily skimmed through yet so deeply profound that it lasts a lifetime.

 

Photo: Wisdom Publications

Editor: Dana Gornall

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Ty Phillips

Ty Phillips is the co-founder and director of The Tattooed Buddha. A former big city bouncer, now pacifist Buddhist minister, and writer he spends his time counseling youth and hard to reach adults in peaceful and engaged means. Using his past as an example, he is able to engage those who would otherwise probably not seek out and relate to dharma teachers. Ty is a contributing author for The Good Men Project, Rebelle, BeliefNet, Patheos and The Petoskey News. He is a long term Buddhist and a lineage holder, as well as a father to three amazing girls and a tiny dog named Fuzz. You can see his writing at The Good Men Project, BeliefNet, Rebelle Society.
By | 2016-10-14T07:48:39+00:00 February 19th, 2016|Arts, blog, Buddhism|0 Comments