bee

 

By Ryan Hutchins

If we hang on too tightly to what we want, we may completely miss out on what we need.

Being too attached to any one idea can close ourselves up completely to new possibilities. Unless we let our desires go, they may never find us.

An example from my life can serve as a great reference. Surfing is my great passion. It has fueled so much of my thoughts and desires ever since I discovered it. When I was not in the water, all I could think about was when I might get back in. I would plan out in my head ways and means to wiggle in time whenever I could. So much so it ruined moments that I otherwise could find enjoyment in.

Life became a series of moments where I thought about what I would rather be doing and where I would rather be. Thankfully for the most part this has faded, but there is still progress to be made.

I suppose many of us could share moments like this. I have seen countless car license plates I’d rather be bowling, or whatever the personal choice may be. We are all guided to find our passions and the things we truly desire. Yet at the same time, we are reminded it is important to be practical and get a 9-to-5 if our dreams fall short. This to me, underhandedly, almost gives us the notion that we won’t succeed. I suppose in one way this is great because it cannot tarnish our hobbies. Passions can easy lose importance when they become work. At the same time though it can also misguide our perspective.

We can tend to undervalue where we are, being too set on where we want to be.

Many people seem to live for the time spent away from their job, which results in a very small amount of the week actually spent on “enjoyment.” Living a life with this perspective can even damage the beauty of being among loved ones, because of the need for chores or housework.

This is a poisonous perspective and one that we should all help each other to remove from our minds. By telling yourself there is somewhere you would rather be you have already closed yourself off to what is. You have already set in your mind that this moment is unacceptable, so no matter what may be presented in front of you, you may not be receptive to it. Open yourself to now. However and whatever it shows you.

The reality is that life moves fast. Every moment of it is precious, and all have their importance. Don’t spend your time thinking about where you would rather be. Enjoy where you are. Open yourself up and accept this moment in all its glory. In doing so you may even forget about that place you’d rather be. You may even find a new love you might have otherwise never found. Let go of what you want, and you will find what you need.

Only the flower that is open can be fed by the bee.

 

Ryan HutchinsRyan Hutchins is a San Francisco bay area native who lives with his wife, son and two dogs. He is an avid music lover and enjoys exploring different ideas and perspectives. Some of his favorite hobbies include surfing, hiking and going on walks to nowhere, but has lately rediscovered a love for writing and poetry. He is a vegan and large supporter of both animal and human rights, and is hopeful for the day when all can live both simply and in peace. If you are interested in reading more from him or would just love to share a discussion with a friend, you can find him at mysticsofgnar.wordpress.com or email are.hutchins@gmail.com.

 

Photo: (source)

Editor: Alicia Wozniak

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The Tattooed Buddha

The Tattooed Buddha was founded by Buddhist author Ty Phillips and Dana Gornall. What started out as a showcase for Ty's writing, quickly turned into collaboration with creative writer, Dana Gornall and the home for sharing the voices of friends and colleagues in the writing community. The Tattooed Buddha strives to be a noncompetitive, open space for the author’s authentic voice. So while not necessarily Buddhist, we are offering a dialogue that is aware and awake to the reality of our present day to day, tackling issues of community, environment, and compassionate living.

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